Funtastic Activities to Keep Your Kids Engaged during Ramadan

  • It is important to provide activities that engage kids and teach them the values of Islam during Ramadan.
  • The month of Ramadan is important in Islam.
  • Children who have not reached puberty are not required to fast during Ramadan.
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Ramadan is the ninth and most important month of the Islamic calendar. During this month, Muslims fast from dawn to dusk. They end their fast each day with a meal known as Iftar.

Ramadan is a period of spiritual meditation and devotion in Islam. It is also when Muslims seek to practice Sawm (fasting), one of Islam’s five pillars. All Muslims who are healthy and old enough partake in this exercise. During Ramadan, Muslims do not take any food and drink while fasting. They also abstain from sinful thoughts, speech, and behavior during this period.

Children who have not reached puberty are not required to fast. They may still be involved in the tradition in several other ways.

Ramadan may be a good time to engage children in activities that teach them essential values. Some of these values include being grateful for what they have, helping those in need, and being mindful of what they say and do. Here are some fun activities to keep your kids occupied during Ramadan. These activities will also help increase their understanding of Islam.

 

Moon-Sighting

The Islamic calendar, a lunar calendar, is determined by changes in the moon’s appearance. Moon sightings determine the start of Ramadan and the day of Eid (which marks the end of Ramadan). Kids may have a lot of fun anticipating these days by observing changes in the moon’s phases daily. They can do this by using binoculars to watch for these changes.

Gratitude Journal

One significant lesson learned during Ramadan is gratitude. You can teach your kids why they need to be grateful for the countless benefits that Allah (SWT) gives them.

To do this, your kids may keep a gratitude journal. You can then have your child draw or write one item they are grateful for each day in the journal. At the end of Ramadan, you may sit down with your child and go through all of these items while thanking Allah (SWT) for the blessings they have received.

Household Companions

Fasting may be physically demanding for parents. This can make it difficult to do household chores at times. You can encourage your kids to take on some home duties during Ramadan.

Examples of such duties include cooking and cleaning up after Suhoor and Iftar. You can also allow them to choose the menu for Iftar or Suhoor on certain days. These roles will make your kids feel loved, respected, and seen as a valuable part of the team. They will also help to boost their confidence. Other household chores that your kids can take up include picking up toys at the end of the day or doing laundry.

 

Kid’s Prayer Corner

You can teach your kids about the spiritual significance of Ramadan by providing them with their prayer corner.

You can do this by turning a part of your home into an inviting space for them to pray. You can choose who will be the Imam, who will call the Adhan, and who will keep the place clean. You can as well rotate these roles between them from time to time.

Setting up an i’tikaf tent for the last few days of Ramadan is another similar idea. This simple play-tent should have the children’s Islamic books, tasbihs, and anything else they might need. They should then be allowed to use the area as they see fit.

Charity Jar

During Ramadan, you can teach your kids a valuable lesson about Sadaqah (righteousness). This refers to the voluntary giving of alms or charity. They may also learn about the difference between Sadaqah and Zakat

You can do this by helping them design and maintain a personal charity jar. Throughout Ramadan, your kids can put a part of the money they earn from chores into the jar. The money gathered at the end of the month can be given to charity. This activity may teach them the importance of giving.

 

Ramadan Decoration

Towards the end of Ramadan, you can decorate the house with crescent moons, stars, and lights to make it extra special. You may get your kids involved by having them set up the decorations and lights and put out paper crafts that they made themselves.

It is a good idea to get your children involved in Ramadan as early as possible. These activities will make learning about the importance of this holy month exciting for kids.

Summary

These activities will help teach your children about Islam. They will also build and maintain your relationship with them.

Scientific Information

  • Suhoor: a meal eaten before the commencement of fasting at sunrise
  • Iftar: a meal with which fast is broken at sunset
  • Zakat: a specific part of surplus income given out as charity
Written by:
Dr. Susan Adeosun, MPH, MD
Public Health Physician
Reviewed by:

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